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Long-tailed Manakin


Animals of Laguna de Apoyo Nature Reserve


Sustainable Development and Wild Nature Conservation in NICARAGUA



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The "Saltarín Toledo" (Chiroxiphia linearis), as the Nicaraguans call it, is abundant in well-forested canyons in Laguna de Apoyo Nature Reserve, Nicaragua. Although the adult male is spectacularly colored, sighting one is not easy, because they are small and retiring, and they stay in the shade of forests, reluctant to enter direct sunlight. They are much easier heard than seen. Manakins are among the more common of birds in this forest, as is evidence from our mist-netting monitoring of bird populations in the area. Nonetheless, the careful eye of an experienced birdwatcher can usually find a manakin, following cues from their frequent vocalizations.

Long-tailed Manakin

This immature male Long-tailed Manakin is beginning to show the colors that will make him spectacular by the time he is a fully sexually mature four-year old bird. It is easy to see why this is the favorite bird species of many birdwatchers. Photo Joe Taylor.

Long-tailed Manakin

Plain green coloration in the female Long-tailed Manakin (Chiroxiphia linearis) can make sighting very difficult at midlevel in broadleaf forests, where this bird remains. The legs, however, appear bright next in contrast to the other dull colors in this bird, and are diagnostic for the species in the area. Photo Joe Taylor.

Chiroxiphia linearis

Bright crimson red and baby blue patches contrast dramatically with jet black elsewhere on the adult male Long-tailed Manakin. This individual is one of the many captured in our bird monitoring program in Laguna de Apoyo Nature Reserve. Photo Lucas Betthauser.

Chiroxiphia linearis

Long-tailed manakin males perform an elaborate dance and song in tandem to attract females. The senior male gets the girl, and the junior male learns the ritual over years. Photo Jesse Bickley and Anna James.

Chiroxiphia linearis is our only manakin species in Laguna de Apoyo Nature Reserve. Manakins consume fruits and tend to stay in the lower levels of closed forest.

Chiroxiphia linearis

Although the Long-tailed Manakin is reclusive and tends to stay in shaded ravines, it is locally quite common in Laguna de Apoyo Nature Reserve. It is readily caught by mist nets during studies. Photo Lukas Betthauser.

Birds, squirrels, and monkeys are among the wildlife commonly seen in a nature-watching excursion in Laguna de Apoyo Nature Reserve. Would you like to share your photographs of the Long-tailed Manakin or other birds in Laguna de Apoyo Nature Reserve? Please contact us to arrange a birdwatching excursion or to share your photos of your own experiences.


Animals of Laguna de Apoyo Nature Reserve


Birdwatching Nicaragua


Bird Monitoring in Laguna de Apoyo Nature Reserve, Nicaragua: Long-tailed Manakin


Bird monitoring in Laguna de Apoyo Nature Reserve


Resident Birds in Laguna de Apoyo Nature Reserve, Nicaragua


Tropical Kingbird


Shorebirds in Laguna de Apoyo Nature Reserve


Our blog entry 1 on variegated squirrels


Our blog entry 2 on variegated squirrels


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Chiroxiphia linearis birds birdwatching

Laguna de Apoyo

The Lesser Ground-Cuckoo inhabits brushy areas of Laguna de Apoyo Nature Reserve, but is heard more often than seen. It is known locally as the "pájaro reloj" or clock-bird. Photo Joe Taylor.

 

Laguna de Apoyo

Hummingbirds abound in the forests of Laguna de Apoyo Nature Reserve, Nicaragua. Photo Joe Taylor.

 

birds

The Laguna de Apoyo Nature Reserve harbors a poorly documented population of Olive Sparrows, which the Gaia staff at Estación Biológica Laguna de Apoyo are studying. Photo Joe Taylor.

 

birdwatching Nicaragua

More often heard than seen by birdwatchers, nonetheless, the most common bird species captured in our mist netting studies in Laguna de Apoyo Nature Reserve is the Long-tailed Manakin. Photo Joe Taylor.

 

birdwatching Nicaragua

Bird populations are monitored in Laguna de Apoyo Nature Reserve by the staff and volunteers of Estación Biológica Laguna de Apoyo. Photo Joe Taylor.

 

birdwatching

The Rufous-naped Wren is among the more common birds in Laguna de Apoyo Nature Reserve. They are easily seen when birding near Estación Biológica. Photo Joe Taylor.

 

birdwatching

Two motmot species-the Turquoise-browed Motmot and the Blue-crowned Motmot-are found in Laguna de Apoyo Nature Reserve. Photo Joe Taylor.

 

birds

Pacific Screech-Owl is common and is heard every evening in Laguna de Apoyo Nature Reserve, and can often be seen while roosting during the day. Photo Ineke van Beek.

 

birding

Scientists at Estación Biológica Laguna de Apoyo conduct surveys of wildlife, including resident and migratory birds. Photo Wendy van Kooten.

 

Nicaragua

Low in the forest near Estación Biológica, the Chestnut-capped Warbler (Basileuterus delattrii) can always be found. This is the only resident warbler found in the Laguna de Apoyo Nature Reserve. Photo Romaine de Jaegere.

 

birding

Animal rescue at Estación Biológica Laguna de Apoyo. Here, Gaia Director Jeffrey McCrary is accompanied by a rapidly healing variegated squirrel that was severely injured by illegal poachers. Photo Anne Sutton.

 

birds

The Grey-headed Tanager (Eucometis penicillata) is an uncommon treat for birders in Laguna de Apoyo Nature Reserve. Photo Joe Taylor.

 

Long-tailed Manakin

Amphilophus chancho, one of the fish species endemic to Laguna de Apoyo, discovered by scientists working in a GAIA project. This species is easily seen while SCUBA diving in Laguna de Apoyo. Photo Ad Konings.

 

birds

This baby squirrel was raised by the staff after she fell from a tree as an infant. Today she has her own family in the trees above Estación Biológica. Photo Jeffrey McCrary.

 

birdwatching

Field research is conducted on several animal and plant groups at Estación Biológica Laguna de Apoyo. Photo Jeffrey McCrary.

 

birds

Spanish classes for volunteers, interns and other visitos are vital components of our educational program in Laguna de Apoyo Nature Reserve. Photo Jeffrey McCrary.

 

birdwatching

Bird populations are monitored in Laguna de Apoyo Nature Reserve by the staff and volunteers of Estación Biológica Laguna de Apoyo. Photo Joe Taylor.

 

Chiroxiphia linearis

The forest inside the crater in Laguna de Apoyo Nature Reserve contains dozens of terrestrial species, making the area an appropriate site for wildlife studies. Photo Jeffrey McCrary.

 

birds

Field identification of the reptiles of Laguna de Apoyo Nature Reserve. Photo Kolby Kirk.

 

manakin

Scientists at Estación Biológica Laguna de Apoyo study endangered fish species in the lake. Certified SCUBA divers can accompany us on research dives where endemic fish species can be readily seen. Photo Topi Lehtonen.

 

birdwatching

Scientists at Estación Biológica Laguna de Apoyo conduct surveys of wildlife, including resident and migratory birds. Photo Wendy van Kooten.

 

Chiroxiphia linearis

Animal rescue at Estación Biológica Laguna de Apoyo. Here, Gaia Director Jeffrey McCrary is accompanied by a rapidly healing variegated squirrel that was severely injured by illegal poachers. Photo Anne Sutton.